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L'ÉTS vous donne rendez-vous à sa journée portes ouvertes qui aura lieu sur son campus à l'automne et à l'hiver : Samedi 18 novembre 2023 Samedi 17 février 2024 Le dépôt de votre demande d'admission à un programme de baccalauréat ou au cheminement universitaire en technologie sera gratuit si vous étudiez ou détenez un diplôme collégial d'un établissement québécois.

Hiring an ÉTS Co-op Student

Looking to make your business more productive? Preparing for the future? A future ÉTS engineer could help you meet your needs!

ÉTS engineering students make significant contributions to a company’s profitability. Hiring them is also a great way to assess the potential of these future engineers. Students bring fresh ideas to an organization, along with skills and knowledge gained from both their technical college diploma (or equivalent) and their undergraduate journey. 

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ÉTS trains more than 25% of Québec engineers.

Internship outside Québec

ÉTS specializes in applied engineering education and research and technology transfer. It trains engineers and researchers who are recognized for their practical and innovative approach. The ÉTS internship program is internationally renowned. More than 1,000 Québec-based companies employ ÉTS students every year. ÉTS ranks second in the number of engineering bachelor’s degrees awarded in Canada and trains more than 25% of Québec engineers.   

By working with ÉTS students, you help train your future employees and raise your company’s profile at a recognized university! 

ÉTS student training

ÉTS students complete four years of university to obtain a Bachelor of Engineering (an undergraduate engineering degree). Most students admitted to ÉTS have college diplomas that consist of three-year programs similar to a Bachelor universitaire de technologie (BUT) or Diplôme universitaire de technologie (DUT). This technical degree requires a five-year secondary school diploma similar to the French baccalauréat.  

ÉTS students have completed 18 years of education (on average) before being hired by an international company.  

ÉTS is inclusive and globally oriented institution. International students make up 30% of the ÉTS student body. Women make up 27.6% of the graduate and doctoral student population. 

Engineering programs task list by level

Internship 2: Aims to meaningfully involve the student in an engineering project or technical work or studies.   

Internship 3: Involves the student in the design or execution of engineering projects. The objective is to enable student to make a significant contribution to the resolution of an engineering problem or to the design and completion of a project, taking the multiple constraints (economic, technical, other) of the project into account.   

***Note: The first internship must be carried out in Canada    

Master’s with project intership: This internship takes place in an industry setting and enables students to make a significant contribution to solving a real engineering problem in a technology environment with all its constraints (economic, technical, other). The internship workload is based on the mandate(s) that the employer gives the students. During the work term, the student prepares a technical report, under a professor’s supervision, on an issue related to the internship. The goals of this report are set by the student and the professor. This report is assessed by a professor. Click here for more information on master’s degree programs with project (in French).

Internship procedure

  • Internships are either four or eight months long. This period may vary depending on the country where students in an internship are based. ÉTS students eligible for internship abroad will have previously completed at least two years of university as well as one university internship in Canada. 
  • Internships must be full time (at least 35 hours/week) and paid. Some terms may vary depending on the host country and region.
  • The employer must provide a safe, nurturing environment where learning can take place. They must also designate a staff member to supervise the student. 
  • From the beginning of the internship search process until the internship ends, a team of employment counsellors and internship coordinators (some of whom specialize in professional development of students abroad) guide and support students and employers. This includes support for administrative procedures such as obtaining work visas and insurance.

Internship in Québec

Create a posting

To post your internship or job offers, use the “Find My Placement Coordinator” tool to contact the coordinator in your geographic area.   

To learn more about our operations and processes, please contact Carine Minga Bahota, Business Development Coordinator. 

Find My Placement Coordinator

How to define your internship internship offer

  • Need a technical resource for four months? Hire a Level S1 students 
  • Looking for a future engineer for four to eight months? Hire a Level S2, S3, or S4 students 
  • Master’s students are also available for internship.  
  • Read through the tasks students are qualified to do. 

  • internship can start in January, May, or September.  
  • They usually last four months, but the second and third internship can last eight months. 

See our Job Offer Preparation Help Tool (PDF) which is based on suggestions from ÉTS students. 

Roles of the coordinator and supervisor

  • Provides the student with support, coaching, and assessment as per cooperative education regulations  
  • Ensures that the student has received workplace health and safety training 
  • Remains available to the student and their workplace internship supervisor in case any intervention is needed 
  • Assesses the appropriateness of the internship offered and verifies compliance with initial descriptions

Provides the student with coaching and assessment

  • Welcomes the student
  • Assigns work to the student
  • Guides the student
  • Supervises the student 
  • Assesses the student
  • Remains available to the student (continuous presence not required, but interactions must be frequent enough to allow students to complete their assignments effectively and on time)

The supervisor will be able to closely observe the student’s progress in order to provide an assessment at the end of the internship.

Supervision guide

  • Make sure your student knows:  
    • Their internship start and end dates  
    • The time they must report to their job  
    • Who to ask for when they arrive on their first day  
    • The dates on which the business is closed, if applicable  
  • Prepare reference material.  
  • Provide a welcoming environment.  
    • Tell team members that a student is coming and explain his mandate. 
    • Prepare the required workstation and equipment (it may be inconvenient for all involved if the student has to borrow a colleague’s computer or equipment).  
  • Delegate a team member to supervise them.  
  • Plan their work: 
    • Set out a clear, varied, and stimulating mandate.  
    • Make sure you have enough work for the duration and level of the internship.  
  • Arrange to have work clothing fitted (if required).  

Plan for onboarding: 

  • Introduce your student to the whole team when they arrive and have them tour the site. 
  • Meet with your student to provide an update on the work to be done. 
  • Outline expectations, work schedule, and dress code. 
  • Hold an information session on current occupational health and safety regulations and provide any required training. 
  • Conduct weekly audits to ensure they are on track.  

Your student will be more motivated if the mandate is clear and varied, and the internship allows him to learn new concepts. 

Internship coordinator visit

  • Schedule a meeting with the coordinator and the student.  
  • Complete the online evaluation form to be submitted at the end of the internship. 

Relationship between the supervisor and the student

  • Be more present and available in the first few weeks. The supervision workload will taper off as your student becomes more independent. 
  • Provide performance feedback:  
    • If it is satisfactory, say so. Offer encouragement and motivation.  
    • If there is room for improvement, assess and adjust coaching, objectives, and tasks as needed. If applicable, notify the coordinator of any unprofessional behaviour or skill deficiencies. 
  • Answer your student’s questions to help maximize their learning and the amount of work they do.  
  • Go over the internship agreements carefully with your student and gradually increase their level of responsibility as appropriate.   

To be an effective supervisor, you need to be attentive to your student’s needs and take the time needed to explain what is expected of them. The goal is to pass on your knowledge and guide the student.  

Qualified internship supervisor

While there are many different ways to supervise, some basic qualities and skills are needed to properly guide and assess a student. These include being willing to listen and have a real exchange by asking questions and encouraging discussion.

The supervisor must be able to assess the student constructively, taking care to celebrate their achievements and progress while highlighting areas for improvement.

Conflict management: Don’t wait!

It is your responsibility to promptly notify the coordinator as soon as a problematic situation arises. 

Most internships go well. Supervisors and students are generally very satisfied. However, difficulties can sometimes arise. These include personality conflicts, disagreements over tasks, a mandate that doesn’t get off the ground, a supervisor who is unavailable, a bad attitude, learning difficulties, etc. 

At the first sign of any issue, it is very important to discuss the matter with the coordinator right away. They will schedule an appointment with you to find a mutually satisfactory solution. The coordinator may play a support or mediation role. 

Discuss with your student the internship evaluation that you will send to the coordinator.

Code of ethics

The ÉTS Cooperative Education Program code of ethics provides students and employers with a clear set of rules with regard to the placement of interns.  

It is based on the code of ethics of the Canadian Associate of Career Educators (CACEE) work integrated learning network. 

Review the code of ethics

Tasks that students can perform

Examples of the kinds of tasks a construction engineering student can perform

  • Work monitoring and inspection (S1, S2) 
  • Computer-aided design (AutoCAD) (S1, S2) 
  • Quality control of materials and work (S1, S2)
  • Laboratory testing (S1, S2) 
  • Project quantity and cost estimation (S1, S2) 
  • Water or soil sampling for environmental studies (S1, S2) 
  • Calculation/estimation of quantities of contaminated soil (S1, S2) 
  • Environmental remediation work monitoring (S1, S2) 
  • Selection and application of appropriate construction methods and processes (S2, S3) 
  • Use of construction industry IT tools (S2, S3) 
  • Management and supervision of engineering work and personnel (S2, S3) 
  • Planning and control of municipal engineering work, buildings, etc. (S2, S3, S4) 
  • Steel and concrete structure quantifying and design (S3, S4) 
  • Hydraulic structure design (S3, S4) 
  • Road and foundation design (S3, S4) 

Related post-secondary educational backgrounds:

Civil engineering, architecture, building mechanics, and property assessment and evaluation.

Examples of the kinds of tasks an electrical engineering student can perform:

  • Installation, maintenance, repair, and adjustment of electrical and computing equipment (S1, S2) 
  • Technical support and troubleshooting (S1, S2) 
  • Computer network configuration (S1, S2) 
  • Programming PLCs and other devices (S1, S2) 
  • Design and adaptation of various types of circuits (S1, S2) 
  • Choice and installation of motors, electrical systems, and power and protection systems (S1, S2) 
  • Assessment, adaptation, implementation, and optimization of control systems (S2) 
  • Use of CAD tools and application to electrical engineering work (S2, S3) 
  • Use and adaptation of multithreaded programming systems, their interfaces, and programming and communication protocols (S2, S3) 
  • Assessment of high-voltage networks and components (S2, S3) 
  • Analysis, design, and integration of telecommunications systems (S2, S3, S4) 
  • Analysis and design of electronic, analog, and digital circuits and feedback systems (S3, S4) 
  • Analysis and design of power electronics circuits and their applications in control systems (S3, S4) 
  • Plant project management and technical support (S3, S4) 

Related post-secondary educational backgrounds:

Industrial electronics, multithreaded programming systems (programmable electronics and robotics), electronics, physics engineering, avionics, computer science. 

Examples of the kinds of tasks a software engineering student can perform:

  • Technical support and troubleshooting (S1) 
  • Data collection and organization and computer program logic design (S1) 
  • Program user guide preparation (S1) 
  • Computer network configuration (S1) 
  • Website and computer system programming (S1) 
  • User interface analysis and design (S2) 
  • Quality assurance (S2) 
  • Small project management (S2) 
  • Execution of testing strategies (S2) 
  • Audit of implementation of accepted standards in the organization (S2) 
  • Requirements specification (S3) 
  • Quality control (S3) 
  • Software architecture (S3) 
  • Database design (S3) 
  • Re-engineering (S3, S4) 
  • System security (S3, S4) 
  • Testing strategy design (S3, S4) 
  • Detailed design and specifications (S3, S4) 
  • Standards deployment (S3, S4) 

Related post-secondary educational backgrounds:

Computer science, multimedia integration, multithreaded programming systems (programmable electronics and robotics), electronics. 

Examples of the kinds of tasks a mechanical engineering student can perform:

  • Installation, maintenance, repair, and adjustment of mechanical equipment (S1, S2) 
  • Computer-aided design (AutoCAD, CATIA, Pro/ENGINEER) (S1, S2) 
  • Manufacturing cost estimates and time and motion studies (S1, S2) 
  • Programming CAD/CAM systems, computer numerical control (CNC) machines and robots (S1, S2) 
  • Use of statistical quality control techniques (S1, S2) 
  • Control of industrial operations, simulation of handling systems, and use of information technology to solve technical production management problems (S1, S2, S3) 
  • Development and implementation of preventive maintenance programs (S2, S3) 
  • Selection of assembly processes, establishment of welding procedures, and use of various non-destructive inspection and testing techniques (S2, S3) 
  • Computer-aided design of parts and machinery and prototype design (S3, S4) 
  • Production planning and management and selection of process control instruments and equipment (S3, S4) 
  • Circuit design and specification and arrangement of hydraulic and pneumatic system components (S3, S4) 

Related post-secondary educational backgrounds:

Mechanical engineering, aerospace engineering/aircraft maintenance, building mechanics, physics engineering, composite materials processing, industrial maintenance, industrial engineering. 

Examples of the kinds of tasks an operations and logistics engineering student can perform:

  • Use of CAD tools to generate logistics solutions (S1) 
  • Organization of product and service delivery (S1) 
  • Estimation of time needed to complete given tasks (S1) 
  • Participation in value-added activities: Six Sigma, 5S, continuous improvement, and Kaizen approaches (S1) 
  • Workstation movement studies (S1) 
  • Use of CAD models (S1) 
  • Participation in design of production, service, and logistics systems (S1) 
  • Participation in benchmarking activities (S1, S2) 
  • Implementation and improvement of materials organization, product and service handling methods, and circuits used by objects handled (S1, S2) 
  • Participation in internal organization, handling, and flow studies (S1, S2) 
  • Determination of transport work indicators (intensity, distance) (S1, S2) 
  • Participation in impact analyses of handling and information flow technologies in the location and organization of services (S1, S2) 
  • Participation in studies of various internal planning models (S1, S2) 
  • Identification of appropriate techniques to solve optimization models (S1, S2) 
  • Definition of performance measures, permissible limits, and applicable constraints (S1, S2, S3) 
  • Organization of a safe production line (S2, S3) 
  • Participation in design projects for service companies (S2, S3) 
  • Installation, operation, and improvement of production and inventory planning and control systems (S2, S3) 
  • Development of production and workload programs (S2, S3, S4) 
  • Supply and inventory management for dependent and independent demand (S2, S3, S4) 
  • Analysis of performance measures of goods and services production systems (S2, S3, S4) 
  • Optimization model design to represent a system (S2, S3, S4) 
  • Model creation for systems design and analysis (S2, S3, S4) 
  • Participation in statistical quality improvement (S2, S3, S4) 
  • BPR (business process re-engineering) studies (S2, S3, S4) 
  • Warehousing and distribution system design and analysis (S2, S3, S4) 
  • Supply chain design and analysis (S2, S3, S4) 

Related post-secondary educational backgrounds:

Industrial engineering, accounting and management, business management, transportation logistics, mechanical engineering, aerospace engineering/aircraft maintenance, computer science.  

Examples of the kinds of tasks an automated manufacturing engineering student can perform:

  • Installation, improvement, and maintenance of electromechanical equipment (S1, S2) 
  • Computer-aided design (AutoCAD, Catia) (S1, S2) 
  • Configuration and programming of computer software and systems (S1, S2) 
  • Automation of processes for production of goods and delivery of services (S2, S3) 
  • Robot programming (S2, S3) 
  • Operations control and industrial system simulation (S2, S3) 
  • Calculating profitability and managing production of goods and services (S3, S4) 
  • Computer-aided design and manufacturing (S3, S4) 
  • Selection and integration of systems involving computer, mechanical, electronic, robotic, and computer vision technologies (S3, S4) 

Related post-secondary educational backgrounds:

Industrial electronics, mechanical engineering, industrial maintenance, multithreaded programming systems (programmable electronics and robotics), electronics, aerospace engineering, computer science. 

Here are some examples of the kinds of tasks an information technology engineering student can perform:

  • Technical support and troubleshooting (S1) 
  • Data collection and organization and computer program logic design (S1) 
  • Software user documentation (S1) 
  • Website and computer system programming (S1) 
  • User interface analysis and design (S2) 
  • Participation in development, deployment, and operation of enterprise IT systems (applications and infrastructure) (S2) 
  • Quality assurance and quality control (S3) 
  • Management of small projects (S3) 
  • Web application design (S3) 
  • Computer systems development: business process analysis, requirements specification, deployment (S3) 
  • Database design (S3) 
  • System security (S3, S4) 
  • Network management (S3, S4) 
  • Multimedia development (S3, S4) 

Related post-secondary educational backgrounds:

Computer science, multimedia integration, electronics, multithreaded programming systems (programmable electronics and robotics). 

Posting calendar

Posting calendar

  • September 18, 2023: Posting starts. Send us your job postings now!  
  • September 21, 2023 (and every Monday and Thursday thereafter): Applications emailed, including a link to your portal.  
  • September 25 to October 13, 2023: Virtual or telephone interviews only.  
  • Effective October 16, 2023: Virtual, telephone, or in-person interviews on site with the employer.  

Important

Use your portal to schedule interviews. Do not contact students directly. We will send them interview notices as directed by you. 

In your portal, rank the candidates you meet as soon as possible.  

After your interviews, the Coop Education Department (SEC) will contact students based on your rankings. Your first choice will have 48 hours to reply to the SEC. If they decline your offer, the internship will be offered to the next person on your list, and so on.  

  • Ongoing: Our staff will stay in touch with you throughout the process to ensure everything goes smoothly.  
  • January 3 to May 3, 2024: Winter internship period. Note: Internships normally last 16 weeks and must occur between these dates.

  • May 17, 2024: Posting starts. Send us your job postings now!  
  • May 22, 2024 (and every Monday and Thursday thereafter): Applications emailed, including a link to your portal.  
  • May 27 to June 14, 2024: Virtual or telephone interviews only.  
  • Effective June 17, 2024: Virtual, telephone, or in-person interviews on site with the employer.
  • September 3, 2024 : Beginning of Fall 2024 internships.
  • December 20, 2024 : End of Fall 2024 internships.

Important

Use your portal to schedule interviews. Do not contact students directly. We will send them interview notices as directed by you. 

In your portal, rank the candidates you meet as soon as possible.  

After your interviews, the Coop Education Department (SEC) will contact students based on your rankings. Your first choice will have 48 hours to reply to the SEC. If they decline your offer, the internship will be offered to the next person on your list, and so on.  

Ongoing: Our staff will stay in touch with you throughout the process to ensure everything goes smoothly. 

Number of UNDERGRADUATE students available for fall 2023 internships: 389 

Update: December 13, 2023  

This information is updated regularly and changes throughout the semester.  

S1: 36 |  S2: 28 |  S3: 33 |  S4: 19  
Total: 116  

S1: 31 |  S2: 16 |  S3: 25 |  S4: 9  
Total: 82  

S1: 31 |  S2: 16 |  S3: 26 |  S4: 9  
Total: 180  

S1: 48 |  S2: 48 |  S3: 48 |  S4: 28  
Total: 172  

S1: 6 |  S2: 11 |  S3: 8 |  S4: 5  
Total: 30  

S1: 18 |  S2: 12 |  S3: 16 |  S4: 5  
Total: 60  

S1: 13 |  S2: 8 |  S3: 7 |  S4: 6  
Total: 34  

Number of MASTER’s students available for Winter 2024 internships: 70 

Update: December 13, 2023 

  • Aerospace Engineering: 4  
  • Automated Manufacturing Engineering: 6  
  • Electrical Engineering: 4  
  • Construction Engineering: 23  
  • Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency: 1  
  • International Projects and Global Engineering: 1  
  • Environmental Engineering: 5 
  • Occupational Health and Safety Engineering: 1  
  • Healthcare Technology Engineering: 3  
  • Information Technology Engineering: 6  
  • Mechanical Engineering: 2  
  • Software Engineering: 4  
  • Urban Infrastructure Engineering: 2  
  • Innovation Management: 2 
  • Telecommunication Networks Engineering: 1 
  • Engineering with a Concentration in Design and Management of Canadian Engineering Projects: 1  
  • Engineering Project Management: 4 

Number of UNDERGRADUATE students available for fall 2023 internships: 389 

Update: December 13, 2023  

 This information is updated regularly and changes throughout the semester.  

S1: 36 |  S2: 28 |  S3: 33 |  S4: 19  
Total: 116  

S1: 31 |  S2: 16 |  S3: 25 |  S4: 9  
Total: 82  

S1: 31 |  S2: 16 |  S3: 26 |  S4: 9  
Total: 180  

S1: 48 |  S2: 48 |  S3: 48 |  S4: 28  
Total: 172  

S1: 6 |  S2: 11 |  S3: 8 |  S4: 5  
Total: 30  

S1: 18 |  S2: 12 |  S3: 16 |  S4: 5  
Total: 60  

S1: 13 |  S2: 8 |  S3: 7 |  S4: 6  
Total: 34  

Number of MASTER’s students available for Winter 2024 internships: 70 

Update: December 13, 2023 

  • Aerospace Engineering: 4  
  • Automated Manufacturing Engineering: 6  
  • Electrical Engineering: 4  
  • Construction Engineering: 23  
  • Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency: 1  
  • International Projects and Global Engineering: 1  
  • Environmental Engineering: 5 
  • Occupational Health and Safety Engineering: 1  
  • Healthcare Technology Engineering: 3  
  • Information Technology Engineering: 6  
  • Mechanical Engineering: 2  
  • Software Engineering: 4  
  • Urban Infrastructure Engineering: 2  
  • Innovation Management: 2 
  • Telecommunication Networks Engineering: 1 
  • Engineering with a Concentration in Design and Management of Canadian Engineering Projects: 1  
  • Engineering Project Management: 4 

Average compensation for students

All ÉTS internships are paid.  

The employer sets wages and benefits, which are subject to the Act respecting labour standards. Students are also entitled to paid statutory holidays and 4% vacation pay at the end of their internship. These amounts are approximate and based on the previous year’s average, so the salary offered may be less than that indicated below. The average work week is 39 hours. Amounts do not include 4% vacation pay.

In 2023

INTERNSHIP 1

Hourly rate: $22.45  

Weekly salary: $875  

Monthly salary: $3,790  

Total for 4 months: $15,160  

INTERNSHIP 2

Hourly rate: $24.45  

Weekly salary: $955  

Monthly salary: $4,140  

Total for 4 months: $16,560  

INTERNSHIP 3 OR 4

Hourly rate: $26.25  

Weekly salary: $1,025  

Monthly salary: $4,440  

Total for 4 months: $17,760  

Tax Credit for On-The-Job Training

Companies can take advantage of financial assistance in the form of a tax credit when they offer on-the-job training (Government of Québec).

Tax credit amount

The tax credit can be increased if:  

  • The student has immigrant or disability status  
  • A company is in its third consecutive taxation year in which it is eligible for the internship tax credit  
  • The internship is conducted in one of the resource regions   

See the Revenu Québec website for more details.   

How to get your tax credit

A few weeks after the internship ends, the ÉTS sends required documents to companies, who must complete them and send them to the Ministère du Revenu du Québec.

Act to promote workforce skills development and recognition (1% training law)

A portion of the expenses associated with hiring a student may be included in the terms and conditions of the 1% law.

Wage subsidies for STEM students*

The student work placement program provides post-secondary science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students with paid work experience programs related to these fields of study.   

For more information, visit the Employment and Social Development Canada website.  

Initiative for Québec only: Visit this page (in French) to learn more.  

*Subject to availability of funding. Wage subsidies are managed by third-party organizations. ÉTS’s role is limited to providing you with information, and under no circumstances can the ÉTS be held responsible for the awarding or non-awarding of a grant.   

Mitacs Accelerate (Research) Program

For more information about this program, visit the Mitacs website.

Take part in an ÉTS Internships and Jobs Event 

The ÉTS Coop Education Department (SEC) and its industry connections can help you organize events for ÉTS students.   

These activities are great opportunities to meet our highly qualified students and graduates and tell them about your company, gain visibility, promote your internship and job opportunities, and ensure your company’s future.  

Internship and Job Days 

These events are held in the main lobby of Pavillon A at ÉTS and can host up to 39 businesses.   

Dates 

Fall 2023: September 19, 20, and 21   

Typical schedule  

Starting at 8:30 a.m.: Booth setup  

10 a.m.: Event begins  

11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.: Lunchtime – maximum student foot traffic!  

3 p.m.: End of event, booth breakdown   

Associated fees (before taxes)

  • Business with up to 499 employees: $400  
  • Businesses with 500 or more employees: $600   

These fees include:  

  • Up to two representatives on site  
  • 10′ × 7′ space with table, chairs, and tablecloth  
  • Snack and lunch  
  • Activity promotion  
  • Wi-Fi  

Registration – Space limited

Only one day per company (including subsidiary [-ies])  

Registration opens June 6 at 10 a.m.  

The invoice is issued several weeks after the activity (payment by cheque or bank transfer). In case of absence or cancellation less than 72 hours prior to the event, the full registration fee will be charged.  

Networking events

Networking activity fees:  

  • Virtual lunch-and-learn: $100 (before taxes)  
  • In-person lunch-and-learn: $350 (before taxes)  
  • Company day (In-person booth): $350 (before taxes)   

To organize an event, email us at JSEE@etsmtl.ca.  

Fabienne Aubert-Lapointe - Placement Coordinator

Region: Montreal South Shore (Centre) 
My work team: Kim St-Germain-Glaude and Sophie Paquin

P20220926 aubert lapointe fabienne 001

Do you have the right coordinator? 

Access list of coordinators.

Recruiting graduating ÉTS students or alumni

ÉTS trains specialists in engineering fields. More than 1,100 undergraduates obtain their bachelor’s degrees in engineering every year. Recruiting our graduating students and alumni for permanent or contract employment is an excellent way to gain access to the latest developments in engineering and technology transfer.  

Looking for a recent graduate (two years or less since graduating)? 

Try our free engineering job posting service. Contact a Coop Education Department coordinator.   

How it works

  • Your job openings are posted online as soon as they are received.  
  • Applications that meet your criteria are quickly sent to you.  
  • If you wish, ÉTS can contact candidates and schedule interviews.  
  • See the number of potential graduating students by semester.   

Visibility 

You can also meet graduating students and alumni at on-campus activities such as internship and job days and networking events.  

See our Internship and Job Events page. 

Looking for a graduate with more than two years of experience or who is pursuing graduate or doctoral studies? (h3)  

Use our job posting service to let our vast network of graduates know about your job opening.   

For more information, contact Alumni and Philanthropy Services.  

Third-party recruiters 

Third-party recruiters are agencies, organizations, or individuals who recruit candidates to fill jobs for other organizations.  

In keeping with its mission of cooperative education with respect to clients/employers, graduating students, and recent graduates, the Coop Education Department reserves the right to refuse third-party recruiters. 

Number of potential graduating students

Summer 2023: 67 | Fall 2023: 89 | Winter 2024: 76 | Summer 2024: 64 | Total: 296

Summer 2023: 44 | Fall 2023: 43 | Winter 2024: 34 | Summer 2024: 31 | Total: 152

Summer 2023: 64 | Fall 2023: 85 | Winter 2024: 72 | Summer 2024: 72 | Total: 293

Summer 2023: 68 | Fall 2023: 76 | Winter 2024: 69 | Summer 2024: 48 | Total: 261

Summer 2023: 21 | Fall 2023: 15 | Winter 2024: 22 | Summer 2024: 11 | Total: 69

Summer 2023: 32 | Fall 2023: 27 | Winter 2024: 29 | Summer 2024: 19 | Total: 107

Summer 2023: 17 | Fall 2023: 17 | Winter 2024: 18 | Summer 2024: 19 | Total: 71