Research in Health Technologies at ÉTS: To Prevent, Diagnose and Treat More Efficiently

In Quebec, as in all industrialized countries, health costs are exploding due to the aging population. Research in the field of health technologies – or in Biomedical Engineering – could be a game changer, either by creating innovations that prevent health problems, diagnose them or treat them more effectively. ÉTS biomedical engineering researchers are working on these and many other down-to-earth issues.

Strategic Directions in Health Technologies at ÉTS

At ÉTS, research in health technologies and biomedical engineering is based on a group of more than 20 faculty members attached to four different departments along with seven research chairs.  Faculty researchers in biomedical engineering work closely with industrial partners and clinicians. In some cases, the collaboration between clinicians and our researchers is so closely coupled that research laboratories are located directly within Montréal hospital centres.

Research directions in health technologies at ÉTS 

  • Medical imaging and deep neural learning; neuroimaging;
  • Virtual and augmented reality in the field of rehabilitation engineering and virtual reality for the cognitive training of athletes;
  • Speech recognition;
  • Biomaterials;
  • Modelling of physical and biological systems;
  • Surgical simulation;
  • Decision and diagnostic assistance;
  • Design of orthopaedic implants;
  • Virtual ergonomics, autonomy, mobility, exoskeletons and biomimicry;
  • Personalized medicine.

Specific Themes

Here is an overview of research themes that are of particular interest to ÉTS researchers (click for more):

  • Risk management in occupational health and safety
  • 3D modelling and imaging of musculoskeletal systems 
  • Spinal traumatology 
  • Design of orthopaedic prostheses 
  • Detection and monitoring of Alzheimer's Disease 
  • Injectable biomaterials and cell therapy 
  • Precision robotics 
  • Rehabilitation robotics 
  • Medical imaging and spectral analysis of the shape and geometry of data 
  • Artificial Intelligence in medical imaging 
  • Medical imaging and analysis of shapes of brain structures 
  • Analysis of the walk of osteoarthritic subjects and modelling of the shoulder 
  • Virtual ergonomics and 3D kinematic musculoskeletal modelling 
  • Analysis of ultrasound medical images 
  • Biomechanical modelling and design of orthopaedic prostheses 
  • Additive manufacturing and biomedical implants 
  • Navigation and augmented reality in cardiology and orthopaedics and 3D imaging
  • Biomechanics and surgical tools 
  • Non-obtrusive telemonitoring during sleep 
  • Real time telemedicine for emergency medical evacuation 
  • Personalized medicine

Biomedical Engineering in Quebec

Montréal stands in 6th place in North America for its concentration of jobs in the life sciences and health technologies. It is also home to 300 public and parapublic research centres as well as several world-class research centres affiliated with our three university mega-hospitals. The greater Montréal metropolitan region comprises 80% of the entire Québec life sciences and health technologies sector. 

Over the next few years, the Quebec government will invest substantial sums in research so that the province ranks among the five most important centres of the sector. These amounts are intended to attract more private investors and to promote innovation in the Québec health network.  
 

The Health Technologies Sector in Montréal
Montréal stands in 6th place in North America for its concentration of jobs in the life sciences and health technologies
Montréal is also home to some 300 public and parapublic research centres as well as several world-class research centres affiliated with our three university mega-hospitals
The greater Montréal metropolitan region comprises 80% of the entire Québec life sciences and health technologies sector
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